Difference between revisions of "Adjunct"

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(from Utrecht Lexicon of Linguistics)
 
 
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'''Adjunct''' is a constituent in an [[adjoin]]ed position.  
 
'''Adjunct''' is a constituent in an [[adjoin]]ed position.  
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:::*"Adjuncts (of place, time, manner, reason, etc....) are optional, or structurally dispensable, constituents of the sentence: they may be removed without affecting the remainder of the sentence." (Lyons 1968:334)
  
===Example===
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===Examples===
 
In [<sub>X</sub> Y [<sub>X</sub> ...]] Y is ''Chomsky -[[adjoin]]ed'' to X.  
 
In [<sub>X</sub> Y [<sub>X</sub> ...]] Y is ''Chomsky -[[adjoin]]ed'' to X.  
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(i) ''John killed Bill in Central Park on Sunday.''
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(ii) ''John killed Bill in Central Park.''
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(iii) ''John killed Bill.''
  
 
===Comment===
 
===Comment===
 
Usually the term 'adjunct' refers to base-generated adjuncts only.  
 
Usually the term 'adjunct' refers to base-generated adjuncts only.  
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===Other languages===
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German [[Adjunktion]] Chinese [[附加语]]
  
 
===Link===
 
===Link===
 
[http://www2.let.uu.nl/UiL-OTS/Lexicon/zoek.pl?lemma=Adjunct&lemmacode=987 Utrecht Lexicon of Linguistics]  
 
[http://www2.let.uu.nl/UiL-OTS/Lexicon/zoek.pl?lemma=Adjunct&lemmacode=987 Utrecht Lexicon of Linguistics]  
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===Reference===
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{{: Lyons 1968}}
  
 
{{dc}}
 
{{dc}}
 
[[Category:Syntax]]
 
[[Category:Syntax]]

Latest revision as of 22:17, 22 June 2008

Adjunct is a constituent in an adjoined position.

  • "Adjuncts (of place, time, manner, reason, etc....) are optional, or structurally dispensable, constituents of the sentence: they may be removed without affecting the remainder of the sentence." (Lyons 1968:334)

Examples

In [X Y [X ...]] Y is Chomsky -adjoined to X.

(i) John killed Bill in Central Park on Sunday.

(ii) John killed Bill in Central Park.

(iii) John killed Bill.

Comment

Usually the term 'adjunct' refers to base-generated adjuncts only.

Other languages

German Adjunktion Chinese 附加语

Link

Utrecht Lexicon of Linguistics

Reference

Lyons, John. 1968. Introduction to Theoretical Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.